All posts for “explanation specialist”

It's Not Sexy - And That's OK

Posted by: leelefever on April 8, 2014- 10:15am

Categories: advice, Art of Explanation, Explanation, explanation specialist, party, substance

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Many professionals work toward the moment their project, presentation, or work blows someone’s socks off.  It’s easy to imagine a dream-like vignette where, once your peers and managers see your work, they form a conga line to celebrate the amazing things you’ve done. It’s sexy, they say. It’s slick. It’s mind-blowing.   It’s a seductive way to think about work. We want to make big impressions and get noticed. We love the attention that may lead to promotions and accolades.  It’s not that... Continue Reading

Behind the Scenes: Making Cut-Outs

Posted by: leelefever on October 8, 2012- 11:00am

Categories: Behind the Scenes, cut-outs, explanation specialist, membership

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Things are abuzz at Common Craft these days.  The book is coming out very soon and we're working on new tools and services that will help you become an explanation specialist. For example, we will soon be offering Common Craft members a library of over 500 colored "cut-outs" just like the ones in our videos.  These high quality image files can be downloaded and used in presentations or in making Common Craft Style videos. Yay! Of course, creating a library of cut-outs requires some strategy.  ... Continue Reading
Think for just a minute about the specialists who make a difference in your company or organization. Let's say you're a product manager. An IT specialist may keep your computers and networks up-to-date and working smoothly.  A marketing specialist may help you see opportunities to reach new customers or help to identify features customer want.  A programming specialist may help you discover ways software can make the product more powerful.    Together, these specialists and others become a... Continue Reading
Imagine for a moment, the person sitting across from you in a meeting is introducing a new idea, but this time it’s different. She doesn’t start with a list of features or technical jargon. Instead, she builds the idea. She starts with context and connects her idea with ideas the group already understands. She packages her idea with clear language and visuals that invite everyone to understand how it works and why it makes sense.  You can see the reactions - heads nod approvingly, relevant... Continue Reading